These 8 Pets Go Above and Beyond Serving Their Diabetic Humans

People love their pets. They’re companions that give undivided love, cuddles, and all-around joy. Sometimes, they give even more than that. Dogs and cats have been known to warn their human counterparts with diabetes when their blood sugar levels approach dangerous levels. Here are some of those pets that have gone above and beyond for their humans.

[Editor’s note: Some quotes have been edited for language, grammar, and/or length.]

8. Skitters

“My rat terrier was 6 years old when I became diabetic. The first night, she told me my blood sugar was low. I had no idea what she was doing, all I knew was that she was restless. Skitters wouldn’t go to sleep and I did everything I could think of — fed her, gave her fresh water, and even took her outside … finally I decided since I was up, I would check my blood sugar. It was only 23, I shouldn’t have even been able to wake up. Skitters saved my life that night and I will always be grateful to her for that. She told me every single time it was low. I was 16 years old when I became diabetic, [and] Skitters was with me until I was 24 years old.” — Chesalea Jenson

7. Abby

“I had begun fostering dogs for a local rescue group when I was 24, a couple months after I had lost Skitters. My 3rd foster was a 3-year-old cocker spaniel named Abby. She hadn’t had the greatest start in life. She had been overbred and had a leg injury when she was rescued … Abby told me my blood sugar was low the first week she was here. It was 34 that night … I decided to adopt Abby with extra money I had from my 25th birthday. I had a connection with Abby and she chose me as her new mommy. Abby tells me when my blood sugar is low or high and will not even let me go to bed at night without me checking it first.” — Chesalea Jenson

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