Rescue Dogs Come To The Aid Of People With Diabetes

Dogs have often been praised for their ability to detect what other animals, including humans, cannot sense. With their exceptional hearing, eyesight, and sense of smell, it’s easy to see how they are naturally equipped to sense what may be invisible to us. Because of this, dogs are now being used for their ability to sense potential medical emergencies in people with diabetes.

Despite all the advances that modern medicine has made, there are still instances where nature provides the ideal solution. In the last several years, there has been a rise in the number of service dogs who specialize in diabetes. These dogs are able to sense drops in blood pressure and blood sugar levels that can result in diabetic emergencies. Founder Crystal Cockroft has been training service dogs to assist people with diabetes, and get them help during emergencies. Crystal has several years of experience working with dogs, and she has incorporated this experience into scent training.

Trained from the time they are puppies, these service dogs always remain vigilant and are conditioned to provide support and assistance to their owners. As discussed on station NBC4 in Los Angeles, exactly how these dogs are able to detect drops in blood sugar remains a mystery. Although they possess an exceptional sense of smell, science is still working to explain the exact mechanism of detection.

What matters most, however, is that these dogs are saving lives. Dogs4Diabetics is working hard to match exceptional dogs with individuals who need them most. These service dogs become aware of potentially dangerous drops in blood sugar, making them faster and more effective at providing a response than the a person with diabetes could alone.

Service dogs are one of many helpful resources for people living with diabetes. These dogs not only provide companionship, but they can also provide life-saving alerts before their humans even know something is wrong. Continued support of such life-saving endeavors will help people with diabetes live more functional and happy lives.

Medianet DBS
A. Boyea was born and raised in West Michigan. She attended Grand Valley State University and graduated with a degree in marketing. She now resides in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and shares a house with her husband, and their two dogs, and two cats.