8 Ways to Save Money on Diabetes Supplies

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Diabetes is expensive. The average American with diabetes spends around $7,900 a year due to diabetes. As much as 30 percent of that goes towards medications and supplies. Further, the medical costs associated with this disease rose 41 percent from 2007 to 2012. Fortunately, there are several ways for people with diabetes to save money on these lifesaving supplies and medicines. Discover eight ways to save money on diabetes supplies.

1. Lower Your Insurance Bill


If you need help lowering your health care costs, see if you qualify for Medicaid or Medicare. These government-run health insurance programs make sure you get the medical care you need, which covers doctor’s visits and prescription medications, so you can help meet your monthly budget.


2. Buy Generic Drugs


When possible, buy generic drugs for your prescriptions. Medicines represent some of the highest costs associated with diabetes, especially when you look at the price of insulin if your doctor says you need this lifesaving drug.


3. Ask for Samples From Manufacturers


Your doctor’s office may receive free samples from drug manufacturers, or your doctor might know of some manufacturers giving away free diabetic supplies. Another way to find free samples of supplies, such as test strips that go into a blood glucose monitor, is to search the internet for giveaways from companies that make these items.


4. Watch for Discounted Merchandise


Your regular supplier of medications, test strips and other items may offer discounts depending on supply and demand. Your canister of test strips could come down in price at any time, so keep an eye out for cheaper prices where you normally shop.

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