Weed Shows Promise for Pre-diabetes Patients

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EmaxHealth Health News

By Deborah Mitchell for EmaxHealth.com

Impaired Glucose Intolerance, a.k.a. pre-diabetes, basically means that you have blood glucose levels higher than normal, but not high enough to qualify you as a patient with Type 2 diabetes. A growing concern is that up to 50 percent of those with IGT may develop Type 2 diabetes within the next decade. The good news is that, if caught early on, the risk of IGT developing into Type 2 diabetes can be significantly reduced through diet, exercise and possibly with a little help from the Japanese Knotweed polygonum cuspidatum.

Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenolic phytoalexin reported to have anti-oxidant, anti- inflammatory and cardio-protective properties. It is more commonly known as the red grape extract that garnered news media attention as the reason for the French Paradox.

The French Paradox is a label given for the observation that in spite of a national diet high in fat, the overall incidence of cardiovascular disease in France is significantly lower than in other nations.

One theory explaining this paradox is that the regular consumption of red wine, known to be rich in antioxidants, must impart a protective shield against too much foie gras. There’s more myth than science to the French Paradox, however, as scientists agree that an individual could not possibly drink enough red wine to account for the French Paradox.

However, this is not to say that resveratrol is of no value toward good health. In fact, scientists today are studying the effects of resveratrol on insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance from other sources such as the Japanese Knotweed.

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