What Does It Take To Be A Diabetic Service Dog? Watch Sadie’s Training Montage!

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Diabetic Alert Dogs (DADs) are amazing, highly-specialized creatures. Because of a dog’s incredible ability to smell high and low blood sugar, they can make life-saving companions for kids and adults with type 1 diabetes. Plus, you couldn’t ask for a more adorable first-responder!

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

But while all service dogs are born with a keen sense of smell and chosen for their aptitude, they aren’t born knowing that they need to identify high or low blood sugar and then alert their owners. That takes a lot of specialized training, and that training takes months (at the very least), and not every dog makes it.

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

Professionally trained service DADs can take up to 18 months to train, and then there will be additional time training the dog to work with a specific handler—another 6 months to a year according to Dogs4Diabetics.

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

It’s possible to train a dog at home given someone chooses a dog with the right temperament and aptitude and uses an appropriate training program. There are also some programs that offer online video training for people wishing to train a dog at home. These programs are much cheaper, of course, but lack hands-on professionals. Anyone considering purchasing or training a DAD should be prepared to do extensive research to make sure that the program they choose meets their needs and will result in a reliable service dog.

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

In the video below, Libby Rockaway trains a golden retriever puppy, Sadie, starting when Sadie is just 1 1/2 weeks old. Not all DADs start training from birth, but the most highly-specialized services dogs will train from birth to about 18 months.

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

Photo: YouTube/Libby Rockaway

Watch as Sadie learns to identify the scent of high and low blood sugar in increasingly challenging situations until she is able to identify a high or low in a human handler. It’s hard to watch and not be proud of Sadie and her accomplishments! We are grateful for all service dogs and their trainers, and we love watching Sadie learn the ropes!

Watch as Sadie grows up to be a stellar Diabetic Service Dog!

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Katie Taylor started writing in 5th grade and hasn't stopped since. Her favorite place to pen a phrase is in front of her fireplace with a cup of tea, but she's been known to write in parking lots on the backs of old receipts if necessary. She and her husband live cozily in the Pacific Northwest enjoying rainy days and Netflix.
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